sherlockbringthejam:

vhanstiel:

klynneb:

grimmspeight:

zellabellamellawella:

neraiutsuze:

amorremanet:

#yeah ok #you ”like the pizza” #right right #death lbr you just have a huge dumb soft spot for dean winchester like 85 miles wide #and wanna spoil him rotten #oh you want your brother’s soul back? #welllll i don’t usually do things like this but omg pls i’ll make an exception for you dean #dean i don’t like it when people try to bind me and make me kill rampaging angels #but i’ll let you off the hook this time because i like you so much #hm okay chicago can stay since you ask #because i ~like the pizza #DEATH PLS YOU JUST LIKE DEAN (via chainedtocastiel)

 

DEATH TRIES TO STEP UP AND BE HIS FATHER FIGURE

OHMYGOSH

Death X Dean is my BroTP

OMG, how sad is that? The fandom’s gone and made Death a father figure to Dean. Freaking DEATH people. I just can’t anymore.

I don’t even have to mention the fact that 

1) He gave Dean an opportunity by assigning Dean a duty
2) So that Dean could learn
3) When Dean failed, he didn’t punish or called the agreement off
4) He just taught Dean more and finally retrieved Sam’s soul for Dean

So, yeah. Death has a soft spot for Dean. After God has been missing for years, who else has the nerve to step up to him? 

Maybe it was all those times he randomly died on that Tuesday.

(Source: casterley)

stoutshady:

emmetbrickowskivevo:

stoutshady:

once i accidentally called 999 and my brother was shouting “im gonna kill you” at his video game in the background and to cut a long story short 20 minutes later 2 police officers showed up at my house to check out a potential murder and this is why i hate my life

I think it’s 911…

i think i live in england…

homohustle:

jotarokujo:

what if the new animal species we discover each year are actually being dropped off by aliens? like they have an over abundance of yeti crabs or something and so they brought some to earth because they knew we’d get a kick out of this

image

This is the cutest conspiracy theory I’ve ever heard

Hanging around Christian doesn’t make you Christian. Playing Christian and wearing Christian doesn’t make you Christian. Are you all alright with that? I’m not being mean, it’s real. I say this again and I say it humbly and seriously, when nobody’s looking, that makes you Christian. When nobody else knows and nobody else sees, the bible says there’s Somebody seeing, and in the open He’ll reward it. When nobody else is in the picture, that’s the real you. When nobody’s aware, that’s when it’s real. That’s where your life changes, because then you’re only doing it for one reason: To know Him, to be with Him.
— Dan Mohler (via northwestsong)

(Source: sonofhislove)

Why do our emotions control our tear ducts?

Short version: Negative emotions cause the body to produce stress hormones, and the fastest way to get rid of them is dissolved in tears. Crying literally helps you return to normal.

Edit: longer versionreally long version

/u/hezec

(via sdsimple)
hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

heartbeatofatwentysomething:

Today, our Savior is risen.

The tomb was empty. The world was overcome.

He did not return for attention on Himself, but in power for His Father. Jesus came to Mary Magdalene quietly in the garden, lifting her head from grief for she would not find Him where she was looking. He came to Thomas with love, defeating His doubt with proof of His wounds. He returned to His friends, the disciples, to renew their hope. Our Redeemer returned gently, with compassion and grace.

Sunday is no longer coming. Sunday is here. When we are weeping, He gently lifts our heads and tells us we will find Him when we seek Him. When we are doubting, He reminds us that our debt is paid by His scars. He is our Hope. Death is defeated. The chains are broken. We are free and He is coming again.

I read your Winter Soldier analysis, and I have a question : you say that "There’s a reason his code name is drawn from an investigation into one of the ugliest chapters of American history." Please help a non-American understand what you meant? I mean I obviously see the Cold War reference in the movie, but from what you've written it seems like something more subtle *within* the Cold War... shit, I mean just "Cold War" seems too evident and I can't find the deeper meaning?

Anonymous

liveship:

wizzard890:

Oh gosh, don’t feel bad, there are plenty of Americans who have never even heard of this.

The Winter Soldier Investigation was a 1971 veteran-organized media event intended to draw attention to the war crimes that had taken place in Vietnam. Directly inspired by the exposure of the My Lai Massacre (the mass murder of over five hundred unarmed civilians by American troops) in 1969, Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) brought together discharged servicemen from every branch of the military to discuss the atrocities they had seen and committed during their time in the war. They hoped bring these tragedies before the public eye, and to prove that American military policies led directly to the death and torment of civilians. Eventually a transcript from this conference made its way before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee during the Fullbright Hearings.  

When Ed Brubaker, the author who wrote the original Winter Soldier arc, chose the name, he wanted something that would call up both cold Siberian winters and the atrocities of war. This fit the bill.

But the term itself, the idea of “winter soldiers”, was coined by VVAW as a response to the writings of Thomas Paine, who described the men who deserted at Valley Forge during the American Revolution:

These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country, but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.

A winter soldier is someone who will warm their hands over a meager fire and weather the cold. Someone who refuses to abandon their country and its potential, no matter what the personal cost.

So how’s that for a weird little twist? According to Thomas Paine—activist, political philosopher, and revolutionary—the real winter soldier is Captain America.

#plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth